Chicagoland & Nationwide

Making the Most of Your LinkedIn Photo

Making the Most of Your LinkedIn Photo

Studies show that it takes 1/10th of a second for someone to form an opinion of you based on your photo (Read More).  Since LinkedIn is such a powerful social tool with more than half of B2B’s browsing the app daily, it’s critical to have a profile photo that wins over your audience in less than a second. Thankfully, the research is out there and it gives us a heads-up on how you can present yourself as a knowledgeable influencer whose word is gold.   

 

TRY THESE TIPS

  • Smile: This is tougher than it sounds but with a little encouragement, we’ll help you pull of a genuine smile. 
  • Make eye contact with the camera: We can do the deep thought photos at another time but this photo is just as much about your audience as it is about you.  Eyes are the windows…remember that.
  • Dress the part:  Financial Advisors may dress more formally than software engineers however keep in mind that more formal dress improves perceived competence.
  • The Squint: It’s a combination of a smile and minimal squint. The thought behind this is that when we appear a little too wide-eyed, we may give the impression  that we are uncertain and nervous.  The squint gives the signal that we are confident and it’s under control.
  • Head and Shoulders: Just enough to show yourself off.

 

The most frequent question I’m asked when helping my clients prepare for their headshots is “what do I wear?”  I absolutely believe that everyone needs to be true to who they are and show off their best selves.  The look may differ depending on the field you are in.  Members of the financial industry may be more suit and tie whereas a start-up tech firm may prefer button-downs and blue jeans. Regardless of your specialty, there are a few tried and true tips that will help you look your best and project the confidence you have as an expert in your industry. 

 

Dress To Impress

  • Layers: Always the best bet.  For example: a jacket or sport coat over a polo or a sweater over a tank.  It’s a flawless look.
  • Keep It Simple: When selecting your outfit, you’ll also want to be careful to avoid excessively busy patterns, bold stripes or logos. A splash of color such as orange or yellow is a nice touch but we’ll want to limit it a bit as the colors can be oversaturated in digital.  
  • Jewelry:  Remember, we want the focus to be on you so jewelry that compliments your style is great.  If you’re wondering if it might distract from your face, then most likely it will and you may want to play it safe.
  • Glasses:  If you’re wondering whether or not to wear them, consider how people are used to seeing you: with or without. Also be sure to clean them right before you come into your portrait session.
  • Hair and Make-Up: If your planning on coloring your hair, try to schedule this with a trim a week before your session so the color can settle. Gentlemen, if you’re doing the clean shaven look, you’ll want to the day of.  And with make-up, think clean and classic with subtle colors that compliment your skin tone.
If you’re wondering how strong you’re current LinkedIn profile photo is, check out Photofeeler, an online tool that analyzes your social and business profile images to give you feedback on how they affect and influence your audience.  The research is very clear in that the key is to create a first impression that shows you to be both confident and trustworthy and using the tips above is a fantastic start.  Ready to take the next step? Get in touch!

 

The Website Redesign Shot List | 4 Must Have Images

The Website Redesign Shot List | 4 Must Have Images

The day is here and it’s finally time to redesign your website.  Your website is critical for your business and it’s typically the first impression a potential client will have of you.  You’ve got your custom web developer, written out all of the content and now it’s time to consider the imagery.  Images can be a powerful type of content that will enhance the user’s experience on your website.   At the highest level, images help your visitors connect and feel comfortable on your site. Since 65% of the population describes themselves as visual learners, you have to plan for people who want to look at pictures instead of reading words when you tackle a website design project.  So, the photos you choose to run with on your site should be custom and representative of your brand.  

With that in mind, here’s the list of the 4 kinds of images you’ll need when launching or redesigning a website.

1. HERO IMAGES

Chicago-Commercial-Photographer

The hero image is the featured photo on the home page of the website that is placed front and center.  These are also typically placed on the top of each primary page of the website as a banner.   Since this is the first visual the potential customer has of your services, the photo should present the most important information and is often accompanied by text and a call to action.  

 

2. PRODUCT PHOTOS

Chicago-Commercial-Photographer

When your product is a tangible item such as a burger, bike or a backpack, what you make needs to be featured on your website constantly and consistently.  Consumers expect to know how a product looks from multiple angles before choosing to make their purchase.  If you’re selling a service, this can apply as well.  For instance, a contractor who specializes in tile work, could show before and after images of a backspace installation.  The more appealing the photo of your service or product is, the more likely someone is to work with you or put that product in their shopping cart.                                  

 

3. PORTRAITS

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Whether you business is a service or it’s a product that your company provides, it’s the people behind the scenes that make it all possible.  We all like to know who we’re working with and who we are buying from which is why it’s essential to include head shots of the key members of your team.  In recent studies, it’s been found that website users spend 10% more time viewing portrait photos than actually reading the biographies even though the biographies consume much more space.  

Keeping the head shots current on the About US and Contact Page current helps to put a face to the name and humanize your company because potential customers are just as interested in who you are as what you do.

 

4. SERVICES PHOTOS

Chicago-Commercial-Photographer

When the business you’re in is a service and you’re product is an intangible one, you’ll need to find creative ways to show off what you do.  If you’re a lawyer or realtor, for example, you’re product is you and your professional expertise so you’ll the photos to feature you working with your clients and your team.  If there’s a process involved, break it down, and feature that process in photos so potential clients can see behind the scenes of your services.

 

Studies show that we process visuals much faster than text and not only do we process images more quickly but we also retain much more information when it’s transferred to us visually.  The most important factor to consider when pulling together a photography shot list for a new or redesigned website is that users pay attention to information-carrying images.  So, the more professional and compelling your site’s photography is, the more business you’ll conduct over time.  

Why I Don’t Share RAW Image Files

Why I Don’t Share RAW Image Files

Ask any established, professional photographer what is at the top of their of things that make them cringe and I would bet it is when our clients request our RAW files.  In short, my answer is always no and I must admit, it makes me cringe a little bit.  Of course, I sprinkle my “no” with a dash of diplomacy but I am firm in my response.

All high-end professional camera systems like Canons’ 5D Mark III produce images that are the equivalent of unprocessed film.   The information that the camera records for that particular image is embedded in the RAW file.  This gives us photographers the highest quality of images with the most information that we can then play around with in post-production.  This is kind of like having all of the ingredients for making a cake and you can modify whatever you want to your tastes.  Coconut sugar or regular sugar? Vanilla extract or almond?  Wheat or white flour?  Not only that but you can play around with how much of a certain ingredient.  The possibilities are endless.

The opposite of this is shooting in JPG mode.  What happens here is that the camera does it’s own adjustments and processing to the image while also losing a great deal of information.  Now, this is like having that cake already baked and the only way to change the taste is to add something on top like ice-cream or chocolate sauce but you cannot change the flavor of the cake itself without sacrificing quality.

As fantastic as the professional cameras are these days and I say this humbly, they are not as smart as me and not even close to being as smart as my image editing program.  Rather than having the camera make the final decisions about exposure, contrast, saturation and all of those other bells and whistles that happens when you shoot in JPEG mode, shooting in RAW allows us to process the image to our liking without breaking down the technical value inherent in that image.

Here’s the Breakdown:

1.) The processing of the RAW images is a part of my style and vision.  As a commercial photographer, everything I shoot is a representation of my brand.  When letting go of the RAW files to clients there is always the possibility that the images will be edited and reproduced in a way that is contrary to what I would do.  Keeping control of my brand is a must.

2.) I’ve worked super hard to develop relationships with my clients that are built on trust.  I’ve been hired because I’m able to figure out what’s a great shot, what’s not and always deliver what my clients are looking for.  So, when I go through all of the images and cull down the shoot to the best selections, trust me….I picked the best ones.  I’m not holding out.

3.) The Raw files are not the finished product.  Shooting an assignment is only one part of the job.  The other part is when I’m at the computer, essentially my digital dark room.  There are so many variations and adjustments that can be made and each modification caters to that particular image and that specific personality that is featured in the photograph.  Once I have had my time playing with the image, it gets my seal of approval and off it goes to my client as I only release the product once it is complete.

Just to give an idea of some of the tools available for image processing, here’s a partial list from Adobe Photoshop CC 2015.5: temperature, tint, exposure, contrast, highlights, shadows, whites, blacks, clarity, vibrance, saturation, tone curves, sharpening, noise reduction, hue, saturation, luminance, split toning, lens, corrections, dehire, post-crop vignetting, camera calibrations, crop.  Keep in mind, a majority of the tools listed above also have drop-down menus where you can tweak the images even more.  So, it’s quite a bit to work with and much of this can also be tailored to the camera system that was used to create the photograph.

Hope this helps to understand why some of us commercial photographers experience peaks in blood-pressure when asked to share our RAW files.  We put a lot of time, effort and love into each image we produce, from start to finish so with kindness and a little bit of “trust me on this”, I must decline when asked.

5 Answers You’ll Need When Hiring A Corporate Portrait Photographer

5 Answers You’ll Need When Hiring A Corporate Portrait Photographer

For many of the clients I work with, it may be the first time they have had to do the leg work of finding and hiring a corporate portrait Photographer.  Being new to the process, they may not be ready for the multitude of questions I ask that help me understand what the assignment entails and how to exceed the expectations of my clients.  Whether the project includes corporate headshots or environmental portraits, there are a few questions I consistently ask and if you’re looking to hire a commercial Photographer, you’ll want to have the answers to these questions ready.

1.) How Will The Photographs Be Used?

There is a huge difference in pricing between using images on a website and in internal communications as opposed to using those same images on a multi-state, billboard advertising campaign.  An environmental portrait that is done for a cover story of a magazine is also going to be priced differently than the same portrait photographed to decorate the walls of IKEA.  Although it’s the same photograph, the image itself carries different value for different uses.

2.) What Is The Schedule?

It’s critical for the Photographer to know the timeline of each project.  This includes when the estimate is needed by, the days that you’re looking to schedule the shoot itself and when the final images are due.  This gives us an idea of how much time we have to plan for the shoot, line-up our crew and process the final images so they are in your hands even before the deadline in case any modifications are needed.

3.) Corporate Headshots Or Environmental Portraits?

Of course you can do both options and it’s actually a good idea to do so if the time and budget allows.  I have seen clients use the corporate headshots for their company LinkedIn profiles and use the environmental portraits on their websites for variety.

However, if it needs to be only one of the options, you’ll need to know:

  • How many people will need portraits
  • The time that you have to accomplish all of this in
  • How many final images of each person you would like to be retouched
  • If you are doing corporate headshots, what backdrop color would you like to use
    • Keep in mind, for this set-up, it’s best to have access to an empty conference room that has plenty of space for the seamless paper and lighting set-up.
  • If the plan is to go with environmental portraits, will they be done in one location or several locations within the same office

Chicago-Corporate-Portrait-Photographer

4.) What Look Are You Going For?

In some cases, even with corporate headshots, I have clients who want to go with a very casual feel.  So, the subject is still photographed against a backdrop, however the cropping may not be the typical 3/4, there is more room for a greater variety of expressions, the images may be converted to black and white and the subject may be looking off camera.  There are so many options so make sure you have in mind the feel that needs to be conveyed and the branding that must be matched.

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5.) What Is The Budget Range?

For each proposal that I work on, there are three factors I take into consideration.  The complexity of the assignment, the time it will take to complete the job from pre-production through image delivery and finally my clients’ price range.

In many cases, when I ask about this the answer has been that they are in the process of collecting bids which is totally understandable.  However, I always try to narrow this down to gain a better understanding of what the client has the budget for and then inform about what is possible within that range.  This transparency ensures that the expectations are not only met but exceeded.

Granted, not every Photographer you speak with may go into details such as this to quote a corporate portrait session however the more details and information we have before we even walk in the door, the more value we can provide.

Getting Ready for Your Corporate Portrait

Getting Ready for Your Corporate Portrait

Corporate Portraits. Social Media Pics.  Avatars. Wherever you might plan to use your business headshot, the thing to remember is that you never have a second chance to make a first impression.  But there is no need to stress because with a little preparation, you can easily optimize your photo session and produce stellar results with these simple tips.

CLOTHES

Selecting what to wear is easily the biggest challenge when prepping for your portrait.  The most important thing to remember is that you need to feel comfortable and most like yourself.

MEN

Go with the classic look.  Something timeless. Think navy blue, gray or black and with pops of color in the tie and button down shirt underneath.  Be sure to choose clothing, especially when wearing a suit, that fits well and does not bunch up when you sit down or button it.

For ties, these work well when their tone falls somewhere between the color of the suit jacket and your shirt.  For example, light shirt, dark suit and a tie that’s a shade right in between and don’t forget that pop of color.

If going more casual, the layered look works very well especially when wearing a polo button down as they tend to wrinkle easily.  But if you want to stick with the polo solo, go with a darker color as it adds to the contrast and depth of the photo.

Think simple and avoid heavy patterns, bold stripes, plaids, checks, or distracting colors as they do not photograph well digitally and take attention away from you.

WOMEN

The same classic clothing choice applies as your final portraits should be timeless.  Again, mid and deeper tones such as blue, green, purple and chocolate tend to work best and are very slimming.  Also, if you are light skinned, avoid colors that approximate flesh tones such as beige, tan, peach, pink, white, and yellow. One fail safe tip is to pick a top that accentuates your eyes.

Watch the neckline.  V-necks are great and accentuate features however don’t go too low.  It’s also best to avoid short sleeves and sleeveless tops as bare arms in a corporate portrait can be distracting, taking away attention from your face.  Also, whatever is closest to the camera is accentuated, so if wearing a sleeveless top, the arms tend to look bigger than they actually are.

As for jewelry, again, think small, think classic.  Nothing too decorative as we want to notice you, not your bling.

GLASSES

If you wear your glasses on a daily basis, wear them for your portrait. Don’t worry about whether or not they are reflective, there are plenty of tricks we Photographers use to make sure that’s not an issue.

MAKE-UP

I always bring a make-up kit with me to apply a bit of powder to my portrait subjects, men included,  as we all tend to glow a bit under the lights. This helps to smooth the skin tones and minimize excessive highlights created by the oils in our skin.

Also, I work with several experienced hair and make-up artists who specialize in corporate headshot sessions. Having been trained in print photography, they can work with you to polish your look for your portrait, if the budget allows.

However, if you plan on going it alone, wear what you would normally wear without going to heavy. Take it easy in applying mascara, lipstick and foundation as a close headshot will capture any mistakes you may have made. The key is to highlight your features subtly.

Worried about a little blemish? Fret not, we have the magic of Photoshop and you can check out a few retouching examples by clicking here.

HAIR

If you are planning to get a trim, do so a week or so before the shoot. A color? At least two weeks before your portrait session as newly colored hair tends to look a little overly vibrant so with a couple of weeks of shampooing, the look will be more natural.

Gentlemen, beards should be well groomed and if you’re going clean-shaven, make sure you had a decent shave that morning of your session.

JUST A FEW MORE THINGS

When shooting against a backdrop, you’ll want to get a heads-up on what color it is. The current trend is shooting against white or shades of grey. So, when putting your look together, go for the outfit that creates the greatest contrast with that backdrop and accentuates your best features. For example, if your portrait photographer will be using a dark grey backdrop, you may want to go with a blue, chocolate or black suit as opposed to grey so that you stand out from the background.

And the last thought…..I admit, I am not a fan of having my photo taken so I totally empathize if you too, are not a fan. But there really is no need to worry as it does not need to be a painful experience. In fact, the key is to make it fun and how we approach this together is probably the most important factor in making a professional, approachable, authoritative and authentic portrait. So, just run with the tips provided and then you can relax and let us work our magic!

Why I Charge What I Charge: Photography as an Investment

Why I Charge What I Charge: Photography as an Investment

It happens very frequently.  I receive an inquiry to provide event photography for a not-for-profit who is trying to put as much money towards their program and has a minimal budget for photography.  Or the start-up with limited funds that would like to get corporate portraits of their staff as quickly and as inexpensively as possible.

I recently estimated an assignment that would require me to photograph two environmental portraits just outside of Chicago for a client that I have worked with a few times over the last several months doing portraits, corporate lifestyle and event photography.

When I submitted the numbers the response I received was: “but it’s only an hour so can you adjust the total to reflect this as we would like to continue to work with you but need to ensure that this is cost-effective for the company?”

I do my best to understand the financial position of the companies that seek me out to help them with their visual content yet it is imperative to consistently educate my clients about the value of what I do and the cost of doing business as a commercial photographer.  So, in this instance I felt compelled to explain why I charge what I charge which goes like this:

“Although this is just a matter of one hour shooting on site, it is an hour commute one way, at least one hour of post-production and an Assistant is necessary whose rates are either a full-day or half-day.

In addition, for every day that I am shooting, I spend just as much time negotiating the assignments, replying to e-mails, writing up contracts, editing and enhancing images, archiving photos, invoicing and the list goes on.  I also have extremely expensive equipment that is state-of-the-art for the industry and which has to continually be maintained and upgraded.  The same applies to the computers, laptops and software.

I fund my own health insurance, retirement and sick days, have business insurance to pay for while also maintaing the vehicles that get me to each job site.  And finally, there is the marketing, from SEO optimization to mailers, e-mail blasts and the myriad of other expenses that come together to make my business visible and equally valuable.

All of these factors in conjunction with the 15 years of experience I bring to each shoot ensure that you receive high quality work that not only meets but exceeds your company’s needs and proves to be of value.

Photography can be expensive.  But excellent photography is an investment that proves its’ value over time.”

My business has been built over the years and sustained successfully through mutually beneficial relationships with my clients, a transparent approach when discussing budgets and of course, by creating those images that best illustrate the message that my clients are trying to convey.

And sometimes one of the ways that I help to maintain this is through education as we often fail to recognize the value of what others can do.