The Website Redesign Shot List | 4 Must Have Images

The Website Redesign Shot List | 4 Must Have Images

The day is here and it’s finally time to redesign your website.  Your website is critical for your business and it’s typically the first impression a potential client will have of you.  You’ve got your custom web developer, written out all of the content and now it’s time to consider the imagery.  Images can be a powerful type of content that will enhance the user’s experience on your website.   At the highest level, images help your visitors connect and feel comfortable on your site. Since 65% of the population describes themselves as visual learners, you have to plan for people who want to look at pictures instead of reading words when you tackle a website design project.  So, the photos you choose to run with on your site should be custom and representative of your brand.  

 

 

With that in mind, here’s the list of the 4 kinds of images you’ll need when launching or redesigning a website.

1. HERO IMAGES

Chicago-Commercial-Photographer

The hero image is the featured photo on the home page of the website that is placed front and center.  These are also typically placed on the top of each primary page of the website as a banner.   Since this is the first visual the potential customer has of your services, the photo should present the most important information and is often accompanied by text and a call to action.  

 

2. PRODUCT PHOTOS

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When your product is a tangible item such as a burger, bike or a backpack, what you make needs to be featured on your website constantly and consistently.  Consumers expect to know how a product looks from multiple angles before choosing to make their purchase.  If you’re selling a service, this can apply as well.  For instance, a contractor who specializes in tile work, could show before and after images of a backspace installation.  The more appealing the photo of your service or product is, the more likely someone is to work with you or put that product in their shopping cart.                                  

 

3. PORTRAITS

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Whether you business is a service or it’s a product that your company provides, it’s the people behind the scenes that make it all possible.  We all like to know who we’re working with and who we are buying from which is why it’s essential to include head shots of the key members of your team.  In recent studies, it’s been found that website users spend 10% more time viewing portrait photos than actually reading the biographies even though the biographies consume much more space.  

Keeping the head shots current on the About US and Contact Page current helps to put a face to the name and humanize your company because potential customers are just as interested in who you are as what you do.

 

4. SERVICES PHOTOS

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When the business you’re in is a service and you’re product is an intangible one, you’ll need to find creative ways to show off what you do.  If you’re a lawyer or realtor, for example, you’re product is you and your professional expertise so you’ll the photos to feature you working with your clients and your team.  If there’s a process involved, break it down, and feature that process in photos so potential clients can see behind the scenes of your services.

 

Studies show that we process visuals much faster than text and not only do we process images more quickly but we also retain much more information when it’s transferred to us visually.  The most important factor to consider when pulling together a photography shot list for a new or redesigned website is that users pay attention to information-carrying images.  So, the more professional and compelling your site’s photography is, the more business you’ll conduct over time.  

Why I Don’t Share RAW Image Files

Why I Don’t Share RAW Image Files

Ask any established, professional photographer what is at the top of their of things that make them cringe and I would bet it is when our clients request our RAW files.  In short, my answer is always no and I must admit, it makes me cringe a little bit.  Of course, I sprinkle my “no” with a dash of diplomacy but I am firm in my response.

All high-end professional camera systems like Canons’ 5D Mark III produce images that are the equivalent of unprocessed film.   The information that the camera records for that particular image is embedded in the RAW file.  This gives us photographers the highest quality of images with the most information that we can then play around with in post-production.  This is kind of like having all of the ingredients for making a cake and you can modify whatever you want to your tastes.  Coconut sugar or regular sugar? Vanilla extract or almond?  Wheat or white flour?  Not only that but you can play around with how much of a certain ingredient.  The possibilities are endless.

The opposite of this is shooting in JPG mode.  What happens here is that the camera does it’s own adjustments and processing to the image while also losing a great deal of information.  Now, this is like having that cake already baked and the only way to change the taste is to add something on top like ice-cream or chocolate sauce but you cannot change the flavor of the cake itself without sacrificing quality.

As fantastic as the professional cameras are these days and I say this humbly, they are not as smart as me and not even close to being as smart as my image editing program.  Rather than having the camera make the final decisions about exposure, contrast, saturation and all of those other bells and whistles that happens when you shoot in JPEG mode, shooting in RAW allows us to process the image to our liking without breaking down the technical value inherent in that image.

Here’s the Breakdown:

1.) The processing of the RAW images is a part of my style and vision.  As a commercial photographer, everything I shoot is a representation of my brand.  When letting go of the RAW files to clients there is always the possibility that the images will be edited and reproduced in a way that is contrary to what I would do.  Keeping control of my brand is a must.

2.) I’ve worked super hard to develop relationships with my clients that are built on trust.  I’ve been hired because I’m able to figure out what’s a great shot, what’s not and always deliver what my clients are looking for.  So, when I go through all of the images and cull down the shoot to the best selections, trust me….I picked the best ones.  I’m not holding out.

3.) The Raw files are not the finished product.  Shooting an assignment is only one part of the job.  The other part is when I’m at the computer, essentially my digital dark room.  There are so many variations and adjustments that can be made and each modification caters to that particular image and that specific personality that is featured in the photograph.  Once I have had my time playing with the image, it gets my seal of approval and off it goes to my client as I only release the product once it is complete.

Just to give an idea of some of the tools available for image processing, here’s a partial list from Adobe Photoshop CC 2015.5: temperature, tint, exposure, contrast, highlights, shadows, whites, blacks, clarity, vibrance, saturation, tone curves, sharpening, noise reduction, hue, saturation, luminance, split toning, lens, corrections, dehire, post-crop vignetting, camera calibrations, crop.  Keep in mind, a majority of the tools listed above also have drop-down menus where you can tweak the images even more.  So, it’s quite a bit to work with and much of this can also be tailored to the camera system that was used to create the photograph.

Hope this helps to understand why some of us commercial photographers experience peaks in blood-pressure when asked to share our RAW files.  We put a lot of time, effort and love into each image we produce, from start to finish so with kindness and a little bit of “trust me on this”, I must decline when asked.